Being Bi/Pan

Individuals having the capacity to be emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to more than one gender. This attraction does not have to be equally split or indicate a level of interest that is the same across the genders an individual may be attracted to.

More about Being Bi/Pan

Bisexuality can be defined to an individual having the capacity to be emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to some people of one’s gender and another gender. This attraction does not have to be equally split or indicate a level of interest that is the same across the genders an individual may be attracted to. Pansexuality is the attraction to people regardless of their gender. Pansexual people are sexually attracted to people of every gender identity. People of any gender identity can and do identify as pansexual. Some people use the terms “bisexual” and “pansexual” interchangeably, but there are distinctions between the two.

 

The distinction between the labels is a matter of personal choice, you can choose whatever you think describes you best. You might also find yourself sexually attracted to one gender and romantically attracted to another gender. This is called “mixed orientation” or “cross orientation.”

For example, you could be bisexual but homoromantic — meaning you’re sexually attracted to people of multiple genders, but you’re only romantically attracted to people who are the same gender as you.

 

Some people assume that attraction to more genders implies that pansexual or bisexual people act on their attraction more frequently than others. This can lead to the stereotype that they are promiscuous. However, just as with heterosexuality or homosexuality, they are all individuals. Any given pansexual or bisexual person will have their own preference for the amount of sexual activity they want, and they may also prefer to remain celibate. 

 

Furthermore, these same stereotypes of promiscuity cause some people to accuse pansexual/bisexual people of being less likely to remain monogamous. This is untrue -- they are just as likely to prefer monogamy as hetero- or homosexual people. Pansexuality is not the same thing as polyamory. The attraction to all genders is not connected to a preference for multiple partners.

 

References-

https://www.webmd.com/sex/pansexuality-what-it-means

https://www.healthline.com/health/bisexual-vs-pansexual